Home Census This map shows natural change by county in 2021 based on census data

This map shows natural change by county in 2021 based on census data

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  • The Census Bureau recently released data comparing deaths and births in every US county last year.
  • Rhode Island was one of four states where every county experienced a natural decline.
  • The map above shows which counties experienced a natural increase or natural decrease from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021.

About three-quarters of the 3,143 counties in the United States recorded more deaths than births in 2021.

This is based on data on natural population change, comparing the number of births and deaths, from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021 for counties recently published by the Census Bureau.

“In 2021, fewer births, an aging population, and increased mortality — intensified by the COVID-19 pandemic — contributed to an increase in natural decline,” or an excess of deaths over births, the Census wrote. Office in a Press release.

Only about a quarter of U.S. counties saw a natural increase, or more births than deaths, during that time. The above map of the 3,143 US counties shows what natural change looked like per 1,000 people across the country. A county in red means it has had a natural decrease, while blue means it has had a natural increase over that period.

A point to remember is that none of the counties in New Hampshire, Maine, Delaware and Rhode Island experienced natural increases. According to the Census Bureau press release and as shown in the map above, the counties that make up these four states have all had more deaths than births.

Maine, for example, had a natural decrease of 6,344, as there were 11,291 births from July 1, 2020 to June 30, 2021 and 17,635 deaths during that same period.

The following table shows the counties with populations of at least 10,000 in 2020 that had the highest natural increase per 1,000 population:

Similarly, the following table shows the counties with at least 10,000 residents as of July 1, 2020 that had the largest natural decline per 1,000 residents: