Home Census New Report Lists Local Communities Among Bay Area’s Most Racially and Economically Segregated Neighborhoods | New

New Report Lists Local Communities Among Bay Area’s Most Racially and Economically Segregated Neighborhoods | New

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A map showing White-Latino segregation on the Midpeninsula. Courtesy of Bay Area Equity Atlas.

A new report from the Bay Area Equity Atlas shows that several neighborhoods in the Bay Area are highly segregated by race and wealth, with census leads in Portola Valley, Woodside, Atherton and Menlo Park in the top 20 most segregated neighborhoods by white wealth.

The report is based on an analysis of US Census data that digs down to the census track level and compares population figures by race and income. The Bay Area Equity Atlas is a partnership between the San Francisco Foundation, PolicyLink and the Equity Research Institute at the University of Southern California.

“A look at the demographics of these neighborhoods of concentrated white wealth reveals how excluded black, Latinx and AAPI low-income households are from wealthy white enclaves compared to their white counterparts,” the report said. “Belvedere and Woodside neighborhoods top the list of the 20 most segregated neighborhoods in terms of white wealth.”

The report compares the number of low-income white households in affluent neighborhoods to low-income black, Latino or Asian and Pacific Islander households.

“In these two areas, there are no black or Latino households with incomes below $45,000 and only a handful of low-income AAPI households, but there are over 100 low-income white households in each census tract, casting doubt on purely income-based segregation explanations,” the report said of Belvedere and Woodside. “For low-income AAPI households, a single ward, in Atherton, has more than 50 households. Meanwhile, Portola Valley, Mill Valley and Orinda neighborhoods have more than 200 low-income white households.”