Home Census Major United States Metropolitan Areas in Transition, According to Census Analysis

Major United States Metropolitan Areas in Transition, According to Census Analysis

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William H. Frey provides an overview of growth, diversity, segregation, and aging trends in the nation’s largest metropolitan areas, as shown by the 2020 census.

As Frey noted, the nation’s largest metropolitan areas — with 1 million or more residents — are home to six out of ten Americans, and that total is only growing as larger metropolitan areas have grown faster than smaller ones. metropolitan regions from 2010 to 2020.

“Additionally, the increased racial and ethnic diversity that characterizes the nation is particularly concentrated in large metropolitan areas and, in particular, among their youthful populations,” Frey writes.

Some other key findings from the article (which synthesizes the information presented in a report published by Brookings Mountain West), with more details provided in the source article below:

  • Major metropolitan areas have grown more slowly since 2010 than in previous decades.
  • The fastest growing metropolitan areas are in the Sun Belt
  • Cities grew faster and suburbs slower compared to the previous decade of the 2000s.
  • All major metropolitan areas have become more racially and ethnically diverse
  • Neighborhood segregation varied by metropolitan area
  • The youth population has shrunk and become more diverse

“This analysis of the 2020 census clearly shows that the period 2010-2020 represents a decade of transition for major metropolitan areas across the country,” according to Frey. This transition “does not lead to a direct forecast on [metro areas’] future prospects.”