Home System list Dangerous Drugs Early Warning System Reaches Online Audience Of Over One Million...

Dangerous Drugs Early Warning System Reaches Online Audience Of Over One Million In One Year

11
0
A dangerous batch of synthetic cannabinoids resulted in one death earlier this year.  The High Alert website sent out a warning that the drug was circulating in the Lower North Island.

Chris Skelton / Stuff

A dangerous batch of synthetic cannabinoids resulted in one death earlier this year. The High Alert website sent out a warning that the drug was circulating in the Lower North Island.

An early warning system alerting people to dangerous drugs has reached an audience of over a million people via social media since its launch a year ago.

High Alert, managed by Drug Information and Alerts Aotearoa New Zealand (DIANZ) has issued ten public alerts on dangerous drugs, including synthetic cannabinoids, benzodiazepines and a toxic chemical sold as MDMA.

This included an alert in April regarding a batch of synthetic cannabinoids circulating in the Wellington, Palmerston North and Wairarapa area, which resulted in one death and hospitalization.

Last summer, DIANZ worked with drug testing organization KnowYourStuffNZ to alert festival-goers to the strong presence of a dangerous cathinone, eutylone, in what people believed to be MDMA. The drug was linked to a number of hospitalizations across the country.

READ MORE:
* People warned of dangerous amounts of eutylon circulating in Wellington ahead of Homegrown music festival
* Warning issued after discovery of ‘dangerous’ MDMA substitute in Christchurch
* Synthetic drugs reappear in New Zealand after wave of deaths, prompting urgent warnings

Police said that in the past 12 months, High Alert social media pages have reached 1.1 million people, with the audience predominantly between 18 and 34 years old and living in urban centers.

Detective Inspector Blair Macdonald, chief of police at the National Drug Intelligence Bureau (NDIB), said one of DIANZ’s key goals is to create a mailing list, so it can reach people by mail electronic when issuing an alert.

Over 211,000 people visited the High Alert website in the past year, generating over 329,000 pageviews.

An example of an eutylone, sold as MDMA, found by the Know Your Stuff drug testing service last summer.

Know your stuff / Supplied

An example of an eutylone, sold as MDMA, found by the Know Your Stuff drug testing service last summer.

DIANZ’s network started with 53 professional contacts, including doctors, drug treatment providers and non-governmental organizations, which has now grown to 430. Almost 4,800 people have signed up to receive alerts.

Macdonald said that over the summer, DIANZ ran a digital marketing campaign encouraging festival goers to sign up for the mailing list.

“When KnowYourStuffNZ reported a strong presence of eutylonia in what people thought was MDMA, DIANZ was able to use their network to spread the word about the problem and ultimately reduce the damage.”

Macdonald said the value of his social media audience became particularly clear with the most recent High Alert notification reporting damage from synthetic cannabinoids in the lower North Island, with a Facebook post reaching 60,635 people.


Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here